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How and why an inmate came to see Jesus. By George Kayer Can events get any more bizarre at Arizona's new Death Row location? At most other prison yards, a white boy washing the feet of a Mexican would get him stabbed 60 to 80 times before the guards could arrive: not here. Before Death Row moved to Central Unit, the men on the Row had been housed in solitary confinement for up to 32 years. Many were just kids when arrested and 20 to 22 years old when transferred to Death Row. They grew into men in solitary confinement and the bonds of friendship developed with others on the Row, some which have been abandoned by friends and family. Psychiatrists will tell you horror stories of what isolation will do to the human mind. Living in solitary confinement all those years created a different social dynamic between Death Row inmates compared to an open yard. Allow me a moment to paint a comparison. In the normal open yard prisons there's a constant, although minor, vacillation of power between the races, gangs and prison staff. A constant hatred for them and they fuelled by resentments, fears jealousies and testosterone filled by ego's on both sides. When this delicate balance goes sideways the result is often a prison riot. The public is often fed a sanitized version of events from the Department of Corrections press release as the staff writer never makes time to interview the inmates. In the March 1 st riot at a San Luis Prison in Arizona, inmate Adam J. Coppa, 32, was fatally shot and six corrections officers were fired or quit after they were accused of intentionally damaging 145 televisions and other inmates property. I mention this not to point fingers at either side, rather to contrast the normal prison yard and the peace and quiet of Death Row. Prior to, and a week after Death Row inmates were moved from their cages to an open yard at Central Unit (July 2017), the prevailing thought was; the worst of the worst (as we are labeled by politicians and media) were expected to attack one another once un-cuffed and allowed to freely move among each other. Everyone has been surprised by the lack of violence. There was a quiet understanding by the majority on Death Row inmates to leave all the hatred behind and peacefully embrace our new home. There were also rumors that some guys wanted to kill as many as possible before being shot by guards. No one knew for sure what would happen that 1 5t week. Could 100 convicted murderers shake hands and let go of decades of psychological deprivation and hate for each other? Yes! Soon after the peace settled in, the local media lined up for photos and interviews with the same citizens they crucified in their newsrooms during the manhunts and sensationalized trials. Shortly after the media coverage there has been a constant stream of tours visiting Death Row, as many as three tours a week; imagine that. Soon after things settled I found out the how an inmate washed another inmates feet and saw Jesus. (download full article on the website) We cannot ignore the other critical factors allowing peace to thrive on Death Row, a prison policy separating inmates dedicated to violence ie, those with a history of violence against staff or inmates. Yes, I'm grateful for the organizations and attorneys who put pressure on prison administrators to revise their solitary confinement rules however, these same organizations need to understand there are a small percentage of humans who will assault others and/or kill again if placed in a general population setting.

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Prison Living press P.o. Box 10302 Glendale, AZ 85318 Phone # 602-384-7591 Email prisonlivingmagazines@yahoo.com

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- copy right 2019 - Living Press Magazine - all rights reserved

How and why an inmate came to see Jesus. By George Kayer Can events get any more bizarre at Arizona's new Death Row location? At most other prison yards, a white boy washing the feet of a Mexican would get him stabbed 60 to 80 times before the guards could arrive: not here. Before Death Row moved to Central Unit, the men on the Row had been housed in solitary confinement for up to 32 years. Many were just kids when arrested and 20 to 22 years old when transferred to Death Row. They grew into men in solitary confinement and the bonds of friendship developed with others on the Row, some which have been abandoned by friends and family. Psychiatrists will tell you horror stories of what isolation will do to the human mind. Living in solitary confinement all those years created a different social dynamic between Death Row inmates compared to an open yard. Allow me a moment to paint a comparison. In the normal open yard prisons there's a constant, although minor, vacillation of power between the races, gangs and prison staff. A constant hatred for them and they fuelled by resentments, fears jealousies and testosterone filled by ego's on both sides. When this delicate balance goes sideways the result is often a prison riot. The public is often fed a sanitized version of events from the Department of Corrections press release as the staff writer never makes time to interview the inmates. In the March 1 st riot at a San Luis Prison in Arizona, inmate Adam J. Coppa, 32, was fatally shot and six corrections officers were fired or quit after they were accused of intentionally damaging 145 televisions and other inmates property. I mention this not to point fingers at either side, rather to contrast the normal prison yard and the peace and quiet of Death Row. Prior to, and a week after Death Row inmates were moved from their cages to an open yard at Central Unit (July 2017), the prevailing thought was; the worst of the worst (as we are labeled by politicians and media) were expected to attack one another once un-cuffed and allowed to freely move among each other. Everyone has been surprised by the lack of violence. There was a quiet understanding by the majority on Death Row inmates to leave all the hatred behind and peacefully embrace our new home. There were also rumors that some guys wanted to kill as many as possible before being shot by guards. No one knew for sure what would happen that 1 5t week. Could 100 convicted murderers shake hands and let go of decades of psychological deprivation and hate for each other? Yes! Soon after the peace settled in, the local media lined up for photos and interviews with the same citizens they crucified in their newsrooms during the manhunts and sensationalized trials. Shortly after the media coverage there has been a constant stream of tours visiting Death Row, as many as three tours a week; imagine that. Soon after things settled I found out the how an inmate washed another inmates feet and saw Jesus. (read article on website) We cannot ignore the other critical factors allowing peace to thrive on Death Row, a prison policy separating inmates dedicated to violence ie, those with a history of violence against staff or inmates. Yes, I'm grateful for the organizations and attorneys who put pressure on prison administrators to revise their solitary confinement rules however, these same organizations need to understand there are a small percentage of humans who will assault others and/or kill again if placed in a general population setting.
Prison Living press P.o. Box 10302 Glendale, AZ 85318 Phone # 602-384-7591 Email prisonlivingmagazines@yahoo.com
Prison Living Magazine
Prison Living Magazine